Steak Enchilada Salad Lamb Stew with Roasted Bell Peppers and Sweet Potatoes Meatballs Atop Spaghetti Squash Skewered Lamb with Honey Glazed Carrots Greek-Style Meatballs Simple Beef Shish Kabobs Steak Zucchini Boats Veal Rolls With Zucchini Skirt Steaks With Fresh Mango Salsa Swedish Style Meatballs Beef Sirloin With Fresh Herb Marinade Butternut Squash Lasagna Butternut Squash and Beef Stew Roast Beef with Portobello and Balsamic Sauce Korean Beef Short Ribs Meatball Bites With Spaghetti Squash Beef Sirloin Grilled In Spicy Tomato Sauce Steak and Cucumber Salad Ground Beef Tacos Aussie Burger BBQ Meatballs Balsamic Steak Rolls Pepper Steak Balsamic Roast Beef Taco-Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Taco pie Eggs Benedict burgers Beef Stroganoff

Slow Cooker Curried Cauliflower Slow Cooked Garlic Artichokes Sautéed Swiss Chard With Bacon Sautéed Garlic Broccolini Garlic Green Beans Roasted Mushrooms With Thyme Vegetables in a Creamy Pesto Sauce Spaghetti Squash with Creamy Mushroom Sauce Jalapeno Poppers Creamy Garlic Mushrooms Apple and Vegetable Stir-Fry Mini Pepperoni Pizza Bites Brussels Sprouts With Balsamic and Cranberries Sausage-Stuffed Jalapeño Bites Sweet Potato Bacon Cakes Creamed Spinach Mini Hamburger Bites Oven Roasted Garlic Cabbage Spicy Sweet Potato Wedges Cauliflower Tortillas Sweet Potato Bites with Guacamole and Bacon Zucchini cakes Roasted cauliflower with mint and pomegranate BLT Endive Bites Bell Pepper Pizza Bites Cauliflower and Bacon Hash Pesto Stuffed Mushrooms Oven Fried Pickles
Cordain argues that chimpanzees and horses avoid meat, and they have big bellies that we would have if we didn’t ditch plants for meat. He also says meat increased human brain size, and decreased stomach size so we can have the six-pack abs that chimps can’t. But I looked at his endnotes with citations to research and couldn’t find the source for these theories. I also couldn’t find research showing that legumes and grains were invented by humans.
As of 2016 there are limited data on the metabolic effects on humans eating a Paleo diet, but the data are based on clinical trials that have been too small to have a statistical significance sufficient to allow the drawing of generalizations.[3][6][20][not in citation given] These preliminary trials have found that participants eating a paleo nutrition pattern had better measures of cardiovascular and metabolic health than people eating a standard diet,[3][9] though the evidence is not strong enough to recommend the Paleo diet for treatment of metabolic syndrome.[9] As of 2014 there was no evidence the paleo diet is effective in treating inflammatory bowel disease.[21]
Steak Enchilada Salad Lamb Stew with Roasted Bell Peppers and Sweet Potatoes Meatballs Atop Spaghetti Squash Skewered Lamb with Honey Glazed Carrots Greek-Style Meatballs Simple Beef Shish Kabobs Steak Zucchini Boats Veal Rolls With Zucchini Skirt Steaks With Fresh Mango Salsa Swedish Style Meatballs Beef Sirloin With Fresh Herb Marinade Butternut Squash Lasagna Butternut Squash and Beef Stew Roast Beef with Portobello and Balsamic Sauce Korean Beef Short Ribs Meatball Bites With Spaghetti Squash Beef Sirloin Grilled In Spicy Tomato Sauce Steak and Cucumber Salad Ground Beef Tacos Aussie Burger BBQ Meatballs Balsamic Steak Rolls Pepper Steak Balsamic Roast Beef Taco-Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Taco pie Eggs Benedict burgers Beef Stroganoff

Interestingly, all of these seemingly unrelated diseases share a common cause: damage to the intestinal lining which allows large, undigested food particles to make their way into the body. This is called “leaky gut and the autoimmune response”. Here is a 7-part video series by Prof. Loren Cordain describing the etiology of Multiple Sclerosis. And please watch this TED talk by Dr. Terry Wahls, MD as she describes how she reversed her Multiple Sclerosis with a paleo diet. If you have an autoimmune disease you might consider trying the autoimmune protocol of the paleo diet. If you do, please tell us about your experience.


According to Adrienne Rose Johnson, the idea that the primitive diet was superior to current dietary habits dates back to the 1890s with such writers as Dr. Emmet Densmore and Dr. John Harvey Kellogg. Densmore proclaimed that "bread is the staff of death," while Kellogg supported a diet of starchy and grain-based foods.[11] The idea of a Paleolithic diet can be traced to a 1975 book by gastroenterologist Walter Voegtlin,[7]:41 which in 1985 was further developed by Stanley Boyd Eaton and Melvin Konner, and popularized by Loren Cordain in his 2002 book The Paleo Diet.[8] The terms caveman diet and stone-age diet are also used,[12] as is Paleo Diet, trademarked by Cordain.[13]
Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health by William Davis, MD. A renowned cardiologist explains how eliminating wheat from our diets can prevent fat storage, shrink unsightly "wheat belly" bulges, and reverse myriad health problems, like minor rashes and high blood sugar. The author contends that every single human will experience health improvement by giving up modern wheat. The book provides readers with a user-friendly, step-by-step plan to navigate a new, wheat-free lifestyle. Informed by cutting-edge science and nutrition, along with case studies from men and women who have experienced life-changing transformations in their health after waving goodbye to wheat. The author's blog. Published August 30, 2011.
While the diet as a whole hasn't been well studied, the benefits of cutting packaged foods from your diet could be huge. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, three quarters of the average American's sodium intake (which is almost double what it should be!) comes from commercially prepared foods. And, one Public Health Nutrition study found that people who cook at least five times a week are 47% more likely to be alive 10 years later compared to those who rely more on processed foods.

A great question to ask is “Does the Paleo diet work?” Here we have a head to head comparison between the Paleo diet and Mediterranean diet in insulin resistant Type 2 Diabetics. The results? The Paleo diet group REVERSED the signs and symptoms of insulin resistant, Type 2 diabetes. The Mediterranean diet showed little if any improvements. It is worth noting that the Mediterranean diet is generally held up by our government as “the diet to emulate” despite better alternatives. You can find an abstract and the complete paper here.
And again, there’s no concrete scientific proof that the paleo diet wards off disease, Sandon says. Any evidence of its benefits is anecdotal. Although some studies seem to support the benefits of the paleo diet, many scientists still believe we don’t yet have enough evidence to know whether the eating approach is totally healthy and without risk. “Nobody knows the long-term effects of this diet because no one has researched it to any degree,” Sandon says. It’s not really a new concept; instead it’s one that’s been recycled through the years, she adds.
Well Fed: Paleo Recipes for People Who Love to Eat by Melissa Joulwan has recipes for food that you can eat every day, along with easy tips to make sure it takes as little time as possible to prepare. All recipes are made with zero grains, legumes, soy, sugar, dairy, or alcohol. Calorie-dense ingredients like dried fruit and nuts show up as flavoring, instead of primary ingredients. It will also show you how to how to mix and match basic ingredients with spices and seasonings that take your taste buds on a world tour. With 115+ original recipes and variations. The author is a popular blogger at The Clothes Make The Girl. All Amazon reviews are positive. Published December 12, 2011.
In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan gives a guided tour of 20th century food science, a history of "nutritionism" in America and a look at the marriage of government and the food industry. Then the book presents a commonsense shopping-and-eating guide, which like the paleo diet focuses on shopping the perimeter of the supermarket. He also now has a much shorter Food Rules: An Eater's Manual.
Cancer: Disease of Civilization? An anthropological and historical study by Vilhjalmur Stefansson. This classic shows what happens before and after tribes were "civilized." Covers day-to-day experience of Eskimo life. Published in 1960. Used copies are available at a steep price. To read it get it on inter-library loan. Another of his many books My Life with the Eskimo (New Edition) is available.
I wrote a book called The Paleo Solution which went on to become a New York Times Bestseller. This book incorporates the latest, cutting edge research from genetics, biochemistry and anthropology to help you look, feel and perform your best. I am a research biochemist who traded in his lab coat and pocket protector for a whistle and a stopwatch to become one of the most sought after strength and conditioning coaches in the world. With my unique perspective as both scientist and coach you will learn how simple nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes can radically change your appearance and health for the better.
The Soft Science of Dietary Fat is a summary of an article in Science Magazine reporting that mainstream nutritional science has demonized dietary fat, yet 50 years and hundreds of millions of dollars of research have failed to prove that eating a low-fat diet will help you live longer. In fact, there are good reasons to believe high-carbohydrate diets may be even worse than high-fat diets. Here is the text from the original article by Gary Taubes.
LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.
Healthy, delicious, and simple, the Paleo Diet is the diet we were designed to eat. If you want to lose weight—up to 75 pounds in six months—or if you want to attain optimal health, The Paleo Diet will work wonders. Dr. Loren Cordain demonstrates how, by eating your fill of satisfying and delicious lean meats and fish, fresh fruits, snacks, and non-starchy vegetables, you can lose weight and prevent and treat heart disease, cancer, osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome, and many other illnesses.
The paleo diet runs on the same foods our hunter-gather ancestors supposedly ate: fruits, vegetables, meats, seafood, and nuts. "By following these nutritional guidelines, we put our diet more in line with the evolutionary pressures that shaped our current genetics, which in turn positively influences health and well being," says Loren Cordain, PhD, professor of health and exercise science at Colorado State University and author of The Paleo Diet. He says the diet lessens the body's glycemic load, has a healthy ratio of saturated-to-unsaturated fatty acids, increases vitamin and nutrient consumption, and contains an optimal balance of protein, fat, and carbohydrates.
They say that low-fat weight-loss diets have proved in clinical trials and real life to be dismal failures, and that on top of it all, the percentage of fat in the American diet has been decreasing for two decades. Our cholesterol levels have been declining, and we have been smoking less, and yet the incidence of heart disease has not declined as would be expected. ”That is very disconcerting,” Willett says. ”It suggests that something else bad is happening.”
But the Paleo diet bans more than just highly processed junk foods—in its most traditional form, it prohibits any kind of food unavailable to stone age hunter–gatherers, including dairy rich in calcium, grains replete with fiber, and vitamins and legumes packed with protein. The rationale for such constraint—in fact the entire premise of the Paleo diet—is, at best, only half correct. Because the human body adapted to life in the stone age, Paleo dieters argue—and because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since then, they say—we should emulate the diets of our Paleo predecessors as closely as possible in order to be healthy. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and many other "modern" diseases, the reasoning goes, result primarily from the incompatibility of our stone age anatomy with our contemporary way of eating.
And again, there’s no concrete scientific proof that the paleo diet wards off disease, Sandon says. Any evidence of its benefits is anecdotal. Although some studies seem to support the benefits of the paleo diet, many scientists still believe we don’t yet have enough evidence to know whether the eating approach is totally healthy and without risk. “Nobody knows the long-term effects of this diet because no one has researched it to any degree,” Sandon says. It’s not really a new concept; instead it’s one that’s been recycled through the years, she adds.
Lucy is WH’s Digital Editor, Features Writer, social media guru and resident woo. A long black lover and foodie at heart, she considers peanut butter an hourly staple and believes chardonnay is the superior drop. When she's not at the beach, barre or yoga studio you'll find her coming up with new and improved ways to kill her unkillable houseplants
This is a complete list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet. It’s a sad day when you first have to say goodbye to these foods but, once you start, it’s much easier and you find there are even better paleo substitutes for these foods. The first few weeks might be tough, but if you stick with it over time, it’ll be worth it. We promise. Here’s the ultimate list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.

The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5]
Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books
Transitioning to The Paleo Way means changing at your own pace. It means taking each day as it comes, step by step, each one in the direction of a healthy new lifestyle and, ultimately, a healthy new you. It’s not easy, but it’s not hard either. With simple preparation, organization and forward thinking, you can be on your way to living this amazing life today. A life that is sustainable, long term, helping you live with optimum health and vitality.
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
For those not in the know, the paleo diet centres around the ‘caveman’ style of eating, i.e. increasing consumption of meat, chicken, fish, nuts and seeds while restricting grains, legumes, sugar and dairy. And according to lead researcher Dr Angela Genoni, it’s the high quantity of red meats and lack of whole grains that are the source of the problem.
Ignore me; I’m just a little teensy bit excited. Why? Because this recipe is about to be in your weekly rotation forever. For the rest of your life, for better or worse, ’til death do you part! It’s that good. Maybe better than your spouse. Especially when s/he who shall remain nameless insists upon leaving their boxes on the living room couches for no apparent reason…

My blog, cookbooks, cooking app, and podcast, are intended to help you translate the “rules of the road” into delicious, easy-to-prepare meals for you and your family. Here, you’ll see the way I eat on an everyday basis, and my recipes, too. In case you’re wondering, I cook entirely gluten- and soy-free, and steer clear of legumes and refined vegetable and seed oils.

I know that a lot of people still call this the “caveman diet,” but Paleo isn’t about slavishly and mindlessly replicating the actual diets of Paleolithic humans. Okay, a few Paleo die-hards may approach their diets this way, but that’s not the way I eat at all. In fact, there isn’t just one definitive, monolithic, one-size-fits-all “Paleo diet.” Some Paleo eaters choose to go super-low-carb, while others of us (me included!) are happy to munch on a baked potato or a bowl of white rice every now and then. There are Paleo eaters who can’t imagine life without dairy, and more orthodox folks who refuse to touch even a pat of butter with a ten-foot pole. The Paleo tent is big enough to fit a host of different approaches, but the core tenets of ancestral eating remain the same:

When following the Paleo diet, you will cut the trans fats and the omega-6 polyunsaturated fats in your diet and increase the healthful monounsaturated and omega-3 fats that were the mainstays of our ancestors. Recent large population studies, known as meta analyses, show that saturated fats have little or no adverse effects upon cardiovascular disease risk.


Turmeric is known for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties and has been used for a long time in cooking and medicine in India. This PBS post goes into much about the history and benefits of turmeric. Dr. Axe also has a great post about how turmeric can be medicinally better than some drugs on the market. Check it out here. I’m sure that by now you’ve heard that turmeric is good for you and your body and it is great to introduce it into your everyday cooking. It is easy to add it to roasted veggies, smoothies, and also teas. Check out our turmeric maple roasted beets and carrots for another recipe idea!
Fresh fruits and vegetables naturally contain between five and 10 times more potassium than sodium, and Stone Age bodies were well-adapted to this ratio. Potassium is necessary for the heart, kidneys, and other organs to work properly. Low potassium is associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke — the same problems linked to excessive dietary sodium. Today, the average American consumes about twice as much sodium as potassium! Following a Paleolithic diet helps to remedy this imbalance.
Skillet Eggs with Mushrooms And Bacon Keto Rosemary Pork Chops with Sautéed Rapini Meatballs Atop Spaghetti Squash Spiced Ribs With Cabbage And Apples Curried Pork Chops With Honeydew And Cucumber Vietnamese Pork Spring Rolls Pressure Cooker Ribs With Creamy Coleslaw Bacon-Wrapped Pork Medallions Hawaiian-Style Burgers Pulled Pork Salad Pork Chops With Balsamic Glaze Simple Sausage Casserole Bacon-Wrapped Sausage With Apples Pulled Pork Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Spicy Spare Ribs Apple-Cinnamon Pork Loin Grilled Pork With Basil Rub Cuban Style Pork Chops Pork Chops With Lemon-Cilantro Vinaigrette Cranberry Apple Stuffed Pork Loin Chicken and Pork Stuffed Squash Pork Chops With Peaches Pork Chops in Sweet Sauce Porchetta Maple-Barbecue Ribs Pork Tenderloin With BBQ Peach Sauce Pork Chops With Garlic Sage Butter Nectarine & Onion Pork Chops
Your Gut Health. A critical review(Valle G et al, 2017 ) evaluating paleo’s effect on the human gut microbiome in both hunter-gatherers and modern adherents concluded that a paleolithic template is connected to enhancing healthier and more diverse gut bacteria, as opposed to those that follow the Standard American Diets (Conlon & Bird, 2014).Why does this matter? You gut microbiome is made up of trillions of bacteria (both good and bad) that has a major influence on your metabolism, hormones, digestion, immune system and mood.
For most people the fact the Paleo diet delivers the best results is all they need. Improved blood lipids, weight loss, and reduced pain from autoimmunity is proof enough.  Many people however are not satisfied with blindly following any recommendations, be they nutrition or exercise related. Some folks like to know WHY they are doing something. Fortunately, the Paleo diet has stood not only the test of time, but also the rigors of scientific scrutiny.
Keto Prosciutto-Wrapped Salmon with Garlic Bok Choy Grilled Salmon with Tartar Sauce and Sweet Potatoes Grilled Seabass with Caramelized Brussels Sprouts Thai Steamed Mussels Spicy Grilled Jumbo Shrimp Fried Fish Tacos Buffalo Shrimp Lobster Salad with Taro Chips Asian Marinated Tuna with Shaved Salad Shrimp Ceviche with Tostones Halibut with Peach and Pepper Salsa Sesame Spiced Tuna Crispy Coconut Shrimp With Mango Sauce Rosemary-Skewered Scallops Crab Stuffed Shrimp Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Shrimp Burgers with Pineapple-Avocado Salsa Sweet Lemon Shrimp Orange-Rosemary Seared Salmon Smoked Salmon With Fresh Vegetables Tuna Burgers Spicy Tuna And Cucumber Bites Salmon Cakes Mussels in white wine sauce Fish tacos Creamy tomato baked scallops Shrimp in fruity salsa Garlic Shrimp With Zucchini Noodles
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine.
Hi Kirsty, I recommend any diet that encourages clean eating and avoiding processed food. It doesn’t really matter which one. The more from scratch you cook the better. You can also talk to a trainer to work out some exercise specifically for fat burning just make sure to measure your belly/thighs or wherever you want to loose weight to NOT worry about weight but rather body shape. Muscle weighs more than fat so you might not loose weight but loose fat and become leaner. Diet and exercise go hand in hand. One won’t work without the other. Most importantly though….go you for carrying 3 human beings in your amazing body be kind to yourself and your body, it’s done a hell of a lot of amazing work :)
The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life by Christian B. Allan, Wolfgang Lutz. It is based on Dr. Lutz's work with thousands of patients in Austria. It deals with the health issues connected to high carb consumption. It is basically an English version and update of Dr. Lutz's 1967 book with the same title: Leben ohne Brot. He recommends eating only 72 grams of carbohydrates, and an unlimited amount of fat. And provides evidence as to why this is the healthiest diet. Read the review at Amazon by Todd Moody (it will be first!). See excerpts from his earlier edition: Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
Overall, the diet is high in protein, moderate in fat (mainly from unsaturated fats), low-moderate in carbohydrate (specifically restricting high glycemic index carbohydrates), high in fiber, and low in sodium and refined sugars. [2] The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (including the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA) come from marine fish, avocado, olive oil, and nuts and seeds.
Too many folks think the Paleo approach to eating is about deprivation, and that all we eat is ground beef with a side of steamed broccoli. “I can’t go Paleo – there’ll be nothing I can eat,” skeptics say. But what they mean is that they can’t conceive of Paleo food being anywhere near as scrumptious as their weekly meals at the local greasy spoon, or as satisfying as the crinkly bag of half-eaten fluorescent cheese poofs on the floor of their car. To get people to maintain a Paleo lifestyle, it’s important to show how the food that fuels them can be healthy and insanely good.
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
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