Cynthia Graber is the co-host of Gastropod and is an award-winning radio and print journalist who covers science and technology, agriculture and food, distant lands, and any other stories that catch her fancy. Her work has been featured in Fast Company, Slate, the Boston Globe, Scientific American, the BBC, and a variety of other magazines, radio shows, and podcasts.
Citrus Steak Marinade Paprika-Lemon Chicken marinade Alabama-Style White Barbecue Sauce Avocado Vegetable Dip Orange And Cranberry Relish Blueberry-Peach Salsa Chunky Apple Ketchup Fire-Roasted Salsa Mayonnaise, Revisited Melon Salsa Cranberry Relish Sardine and roasted garlic spread Asparagus pesto Strawberry balsamic vinaigrette Red Pepper Dip Homemade Paleo condiments Salad dressing and vinaigrettes Homemade Pesto Baba Ghanoush Paleo Mayonnaise Mexican Salsa verde Quick and Easy Guacamole Sriracha Sauce
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […]
The rationale for the Paleolithic diet derives from proponents' claims relating to evolutionary medicine.[22] Advocates of the diet state that humans were genetically adapted to eating specifically those foods that were readily available to them in their local environments. These foods therefore shaped the nutritional needs of Paleolithic humans. They argue that the physiology and metabolism of modern humans have changed little since the Paleolithic era.[23] Natural selection is a long process, and the cultural and lifestyle changes introduced by western culture have occurred quickly. The argument is that modern humans have therefore not been able to adapt to the new circumstances.[24] The agricultural revolution brought the addition of grains and dairy to the diet.[25]
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.
So glad you commented! I get so excited when I see other local people making healthy lifestyle changes. Making a change as a family is a great way to motivate each other. My dad was a major reason I went Paleo, and we keep each other on track in all aspects of health! About your question, this mayo is definitely tastier and healthier than store bought mayo. I absolutely despise regular mayo, and I love this recipe. If you aren’t a big fan of chicken salad, this might not be the first recipe to start; although the flavor is pretty mild. You can find more in the recipe index though. And yes about Vive! It’s honestly my favorite food place in Mandeville area. The lunch is delicious and they have a restaurant upstairs called Opal Basil. The food is divine!! Feel free to ask any more questions. Good luck in nursing school!
The theory is our bodies were designed, and still optimized, to eat what our Paleolithic ancestors ate. Like your hunger-gatherer forefathers, on Paleo you get all the meat from wild animals and unlimited fruits and vegetables you can eat. But no starchy vegetables (like potatoes), no legumes (like lentils or beans), no wheat, and no grains (like quinoa or corn) because those plants were invented by human beings during the agricultural revolution after our Paleolithic ancestors left the planet. You get one cheat day where you can eat whatever you want (“Occasional cheating and digressions may be just what you need to help you stick to the diet.”) No oil because it puts omega 6 and omega 3 ratios out of whack which should never exceed 2:1, except olive oil if you must. Dairy is also prohibited. And meat must come from animals that weren’t fed grains (like corn) because grains lead to inflammation and increased fat.
Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes: These are just a few of the health conditions that proponents of thePaleolithic diet, or caveman diet, blame on our sedentary lifestyles and modern diets, which are loaded with sugar, fat, and processed foods. Their proposed solution? Cut modern foods from our diet and return to the way our early hunter-gatherer ancestors ate.
For immediate weight loss, Paleo is a great and healthy solution. But after carefully reading and considering, I’m unconvinced that Paleo is optimal for long-term health. I think, in fact, it might lead to heart disease and other ills associated with heavy meat consumption. Although many of Cordain’s theories fall apart long-term, I thoroughly enjoyed the read and highly recommend the book. You should read critically and decide for yourself.
Fruits are not only delicious, but they’re also great for you. That said, fruits (even paleo-approved ones) contain large amounts of fructose which, while much better than HFCS (high-fructose corn syrup), is still sugar. If you’re looking to lose weight on the paleo diet, you’ll want to cut back on your fruit intake and focus more on the vegetables allowed on the paleo diet. However, feel free to have one to three servings of fruit a day. Check out this list of paleo diet fruits and see if you’re not hungry by the end! (We’ll admit, we’re partial to blackberries!)

Slow Cooker Butternut Squash Soup Paleo Chicken Pot Pie Soup Slow Cooker Beef And Rutabaga Stew Curried Cauliflower And Kale Soup Creamy Onion Soup Cauliflower Chowder Cream of Chicken and Leek Soup Beef and Winter Vegetable Soup Slow Cooker Sweet Potato Soup Curried Acorn Squash Soup Wild Mushroom Soup Coconut Lime Chicken Soup Cream of Zucchini Soup Creamy Zucchini And Mushroom Soup Chunky Meat and Vegetable Soup Tomato Soup Carrot Potage Ham and Pumpkin Soup Turban Squash Soup Turnip, Potato, And Pear Soup Beet and Tomato Soup Mexican chicken soup Roasted Cauliflower And Sweet Potato Soup Leek and sweet potato soup Creamy Chicken And Vegetable Soup Sweet potato and sausage soup Butternut squash soup Roasted Cauliflower Soup
All involve eating whole foods (as opposed to packaged and processed) and filling your plate with quality sources of protein, healthy fats, complex carbohydrates, and vitamin-, mineral-, and fiber-rich vegetables. (Again, we’re talking about the ones that fall somewhere on the healthy spectrum, not unhealthy fad diets like, ahem, the Grapefruit Diet.)

Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.


1. Meat: It’s not always for dinner. Cooking meat transforms it: Roasting it or braising it for hours in liquid unlocks complex smells and flavors that are hard to resist. In addition to converting it into something we crave, intense heat also breaks down the meat into nutrients that we can more easily access. Our ancient ancestors likely loved the smell of meat on an open fire as much as we do. 
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